CONGRESSMAN PAUL BROUN TO SPEAK IN HONOUR OF CONFEDERATE HERO

(Atlanta – October 29, 2014) The Americus camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) organization will host an annual Memorial Service for Civil War Andersonville Prison Commandant Capt. Henry Wirz on Sunday Nov. 9. The musical group, “A Joyful Noise,” from Leesburg, will play and sing Southern Confederate songs and Gospel Hymns from 2 to 3PM followed by a formal memorial service. The public is invited to join the SCV and pay tribute to a Southern hero and martyr.

   The guest speaker will be Congressman Paul Broun from Athens .  Dr. Broun, a native of Athens, practiced medicine in Americus many years ago.  Confederate Reenactors “The Muckalee Guards” will provide Honor Guard duties during the Service.

   When the War Between the States (Civil War) ended in 1865, Capt. Wirz was paroled.  However, shortly thereafter, he was arrested and carried to Washington , D.C. where he was placed in the Old Capitol Prison.  His trial before a military tribunal lasted several months, and included the perjured testimony of a Yankee soldier who was a deserter from a NY. Regiment who falsely claimed to be a great nephew of Lafayette of Revolutionary war fame.  For his false testimony against Capt. Wirz, he was given a position with the U.S. Dept. of the Interior.  It was later learned that this key witness whose perjured testimony contributed considerably to the conviction had never been at Andersonville . The vast Majority of defense witnesses for Capt. Wirz were not permitted to testify.  Many historians call his trial a farce and travesty of justice.  After the war, James Madison Page, a Michigan cavalryman, who had been a POW at Andersonville , wrote a book completely exonerating Wirz.

  Capt. Wirz was found guilty of murdering 13 Union prisoners at Andersonville, although not a single body, nor even the name of any of the 13 was ever produced.  He was also falsely convicted on a second charge of conspiracy with high ranking members of the Confederate government to create the conditions that caused the high death rate. Wirz was made a scapegoat for the South.  On Nov. 10, 1865, Capt. Wirz was hanged in the yard of the Old Capitol Prison.  He declared his innocence to the end. The night before the hanging he was offered a commuted sentence if he would implicate Confederate President Jefferson Davis as a conspirator for Andersonville deaths. Wirz was an honorable man and would not lie to save his life.

   After the hanging, the barbaric Yankees cut off his head and arms and other body parts, and exhibited them about the country. It took Capt. Wirz’s attorney, Louis Schade, four years to collect enough body parts to have a Christian burial in Mount Olivet Cemetery in Washington .

    The highly biased Northern version of Andersonville Civil War Prison (POW) Camp is well known however the true facts concerning Andersonville  are not well known. The government of The Confederate States of America issued an order that a large POW prison should be constructed in early 1864 to alleviate crowding in existing camps in the South. The requirements were that it be constructed at a location further South away from the battle front and should be a healthy location with plenty of pure water, a running stream, close to grist and saw mills and if possible have shade trees. The location selected was in South Georgia in Sumter County and was officially named Camp Sumter although it became known as Andersonville . It was constructed to house 10,000 Union POW’s however numbers increased to as high as 45,000 due to a policy by the Lincoln administration to discontinue exchanges.

   The average death rate at other POW camps in the South was about 9% as compared to 12% for POW camps in the North where Confederate POW’s were incarcerated.  In contrast the death rate at Andersonville was approximately 29% due to causes beyond the control of Confederate authorities and was unintentional. Also in contrast were the similar death rates at several Northern POW camps notably Elmira New York and Camp Douglas Chicago where the high death rates have been proven to be intentional.

    It is a well known fact that the victor of a war writes the history from a biased perspective. Immediately after the end of the war absurd war crimes claims were made by Northern politicians, military authorities, newspapers, periodicals, and citizens that the decisions and conditions that caused the human disaster at Andersonville were intentional on the part of Confederate authorities. Demands for War Crimes Trials were made and the Commandant of Andersonville POW camp, Capt. Henry Wirz, was arrested, tried, and convicted in a farce trial by a military tribunal who had predetermined that a conviction would result. No War Crimes Charges against Northern POW commandants were ever made and no Northern POW camp has ever been enshrined by the U.S. Government as a memorial to Confederate POW’s. Only Andersonville in the South has been enshrined and it has become a memorial to American POW’s of all wars that have involved American veterans.

   In defense of the Confederate government and Confederate prison officials in regards to Andersonville, a response was made in 1876, by the Southern Historical Society, consisting of 9 points that place the blame for deaths and suffering at Andersonville totally on Northern politicians and military authorities. Specifically President Lincoln, Sec. of War Stanton, Asst. Sec. of War Dana, and Gen. Grant shoulder the blame as noted in the following 9 points.

1. It is not denied that great suffering and mortality occurred but it was due to circumstances and conditions beyond Confederate control.
2. If the death rate be adduced as “circumstantial evidence of barbarity” the rate of Confederate deaths was higher in Northern POW camps where there was an abundance of food, medicine, and shelter.
3. The Union POW’s were given the same rations as Confederate guards and soldiers and equal treatment in hospitals as required by the CSA government and the death rate of CSA guards was the same as POW’s.  The Northern Federal government did not have this humane policy.
4. The exchange of prisoners was refused by the North
5. The CSA government requested that Northern doctors and medicine be sent to treat Northern POW’s and the request was denied.
6. The CSA tried to buy supplies including bowls and other utensils to use in feeding the POW’s. They offered to pay with cotton and gold but the offer was refused by the Lincoln administration.
7. The Federal Government under President Lincoln made medicine contraband causing suffering and death of Union POW’s and all Southerners, military and civilian.
8. Prior to the period of greatest mortality, the CSA authorities offered to release the Andersonville POW’s without exchange but the offer was not accepted by the Lincoln Administration who was told by CSA authorities “we cannot feed or care for them-just come get them”. Sherman ‘s barbaric war crimes in Georgia consisting of stealing, destroying, and burning made food and supplies even scarcer and increased suffering and mortality.
9. The Northern press was furnished lies and propaganda by Union Sec. and Asst Sec. of War Stanton and Dana claiming deliberate cruelties and war crimes by the South. The control of Northern POW camps was transferred by Stanton and Dana to vindictive partisan criminal elements and deliberate war crimes of cruelty, torture, and murder were committed against Confederate POW’s as proven by a joint resolution of the U.S. Senate and House SR97.

  In 1906 former Confederate General Stephen D. Lee charged the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) organization with the duty to defend the honor of the South and the Confederate Soldier:

“To you, Sons of Confederate Veterans, we will commit the vindication of the Cause for which we fought.  To your strength will be given the defense of the Confederate soldier’s good name, the guardianship of his history, the emulation of his virtues, the perpetuation of those principles which he loved and which you love also, and those ideals which made him glorious and which you also cherish.  Remember, it is your duty to see that the true history of the South is presented to future generations.”

 

For more information about the Sons of Confederate Veterans or any of this year’s planned events to commemorate the Sesquicentennial of the War, contact the Georgia SCV at 404-456-3393 or online at www.GeorgiaSCV.org

 

SCV Camp 458 Meeting this Saturday! **Dues are Due**

Greetings Compatriots and Friends,
  This is just a reminder that we’re having our November Camp meeting this Saturday, November 1st at 11am. We’re meeting at the Bomber Wings of Freedom Hall in Milwaukie Oregon. We have a lot of important business to discuss and events to plan, including planning our annual Christmas Dinner. Please make sure to attend this meeting!
  Also, if you have not paid your Dues yet, please do so ASAP! Beginning November 1st, if you have not paid yet, your membership will be considered delinquent, and will have to pay an extra $5 to reactivate your membership.
  Camp dues are $25 and National dues are $30.
  Send Camp dues to:
SCV Camp 458
PO Box 222, Condon, OR.
97823-0222.
Send National dues to:
Sons of Confederate Veterans
P.O. Box 59
Columbia, TN 38402
See ya Saturday!
Thank You,
Erik Ernst
Commander
SCV Pacific NW Division

SCV Camp 458 Meeting, this Saturday. Special Guest Speaker!

Fellow Compatriots,
 
  We have a special guest speaker coming to our Meeting this Saturday, September 6th. His name is Jim Cross, and he is a specialist in Confederate Medicine during the war. He will be speaking after our business session.
  The meeting starts at 11am, at the Bomber Wings of Freedom Hall, in Milwaukie, OR. We have some important, last minute, Convention business that needs to be covered as well, so please don’t miss this meeting!
  If you have any other questions, please call me at (503)888-7773, or email me at imbel308win@yahoo.com.
 
See ya Saturday!
 
Thank You,
Erik Ernst
Commander
SCV Pacific NW Division

SCV Recruiting Event: “Civil War” Reenactment at Fort Stevens, August 30th-Sept. 1st.

Fellow Compatriots,

  SCV Camp 458 and some of us from the Pacific NW Division Board, will be having a recruiting event at the Fort Stevens State Park “Civil War” Reenactment. It will be on August 30th thru September 1st.

  We are be bringing our Camp merchandise and recruiting literature.

  We will need volunteers to help man the booth. Please let me know if you can make it.

  Also, the Camping spots are $15 for tents, $20 for RV’s. Follow this link to get the form and where to send payment to http://www.nwcwc.org/event_info.html

  My number is (503)888-7773.

Thanks,
Erik Ernst

Commander

SCV Pacific NW Division

scvpacnw.wordpress.com

Lee in the Mountains 1865-1870 by Donald Davidson

This is one of the greatest poems ever written in the English language. Read it out loud for best effect.

You can here Davidson read the poem here: Lee in the Mountains

Lee in the Mountains 

Walking into the shadows, walking alone
Where the sun falls through the ruined boughs of locust
Up to the president’s office. . . .
                                 Hearing the voices

Whisper, Hush, it is General Lee! And strangely
Hearing my own voice say, Good morning, boys.
(Don’t get up. You are early. It is long
Before the bell. You will have long to wait
On these cold steps
. . . .)
                          The young have time to wait

But soldiers’ faces under their tossing flags
Lift no more by any road or field,
And I am spent with old wars and new sorrow.
Walking the rocky path, where steps decay
And the paint cracks and grass eats on the stone.
It is not General Lee, young men. . . .
It is Robert Lee in a dark civilian suit who walks,
An outlaw fumbling for the latch, a voice
Commanding in a dream where no flag flies.

My father’s house is taken and his hearth
Left to the candle-drippings where the ashes
Whirl at a chimney-breath on the cold stone.
I can hardly remember my father’s look, I cannot
Answer his voice as he calls farewell in the misty
Mounting where riders gather at gates.
He was old then——I was a child——his hand
Held out for mine, some daybreak snatched away,
And he rode out, a broken man. Now let
His lone grave keep, surer than cypress roots,
The vow I made beside him. God too late
Unseals to certain eyes the drift
Of time and the hopes of men and a sacred cause.
The fortune of the Lees goes with the land
Whose sons will keep it still. My mother
Told me much. She sat among the candles,
Fingering the Memoirs, now so long unread.
And as my pen moves on across the page
Her voice comes back, a murmuring distillation
Of old Virginia times now faint and gone,
The hurt of all that was and cannot be.

Why did my father write? I know he saw
History clutched as a wraith out of blowing mist
Where tongues are loud, and a glut of little souls
Laps at the too much blood and the burning house.
He would have his say, but I shall not have mine.
What I do is only a son’s devoir
To a lost father. Let him only speak.
The rest must pass to men who never knew
(But on a written page) the strike of armies,
And never heard the long Confederate cry
Charge through the muzzling smoke or saw the bright
Eyes of the beardless boys go up to death.
It is Robert Lee who writes with his father’s hand——
The rest must go unsaid and the lips be locked.

If all were told, as it cannot be told——
If all the dread opinion of the heart
Now could speak, now in the shame and torment
Lashing the bound and trampled States——

If a word were said, as it cannot be said——
I see clear waters run in Virginia’s Valley
And in the house the weeping of young women
Rises no more. The waves of grain begin.
The Shenandoah is golden with a new grain.
The Blue Ridge, crowned with a haze of light,
Thunders no more. The horse is at plough. The rifle
Returns to the chimney crotch and the hunter’s hand.
And nothing else than this? Was it for this
That on an April day we stacked our arms
Obedient to a soldier’s trust? To lie
Ground by heels of little men, Forever maimed, defeated, lost, impugned?
And was I then betrayed? Did I betray?

If it were said, as it still might be said——
If it were said, and a word should run like fire,
Like living fire into the roots of grass,
The sunken flag would kindle on wild hills,
The brooding hearts would waken, and the dream
Stir like a crippled phantom under the pines,
And this torn earth would quicken into shouting
Beneath the feet of the ragged bands——
                                     The pen
Turns to the waiting page, the sword
Bows to the rust that cankers and the silence.

Among these boys whose eyes lift up to mine
Within gray walls where droning wasps repeat
A hollow reveille, I still must face,
Day after day, the courier with his summons
Once more to surrender, now to surrender all.
Without arms or men I stand, but with knowledge only
I face what long I saw, before others knew,
When Pickett’s men streamed back, and I heard the tangled
Cry of the Wilderness wounded, bloody with doom.

The mountains, once I said, in the little room
At Richmond, by the huddled fire, but still
The President shook his head. The mountains wait,
I said, in the long beat and rattle of siege
At cratered Petersbyrg. Too late
We sought the mountains and those people came.
And Lee is in the mountains now, beyond Appomatox,
Listening long for voices that will never speak
Again; hearing the hoofbeats that come and go and fade
Without a stop, without a brown hand lifting
The tent-flap, or a bugle call at dawn,
Or ever on the long white road the flag
Of Jackson’s quick brigades. I am alone,
Trapped, consenting, taken at last in mountains.

It is not the bugle now, or the long roll beating.
The simple stroke of a chapel bell forbids
The hurtling dream, recalls the lonely mind.
Young men, the God of your fathers is a just
And merciful God Who in this blood once shed
On your green altars measures out all days,
And measures out the grace
Whereby alone we live;
And in His might He waits,
Brooding within the certitude of time,
To bring this lost forsaken valor
And the fierce faith undying
And the love quenchless
To flower among the hills to which we cleave,
To fruit upon the mountains whither we flee,
Never forsaking, never denying
His children and His children’s children forever
Unto all generations of the faithful heart.

Fort Stevens “Civil War” Reenactment Recruiting Event

On August 30th thru September 1st, Ft. Stevens will be having its annual “Civil War” Reenactment. I’m checking to see how many SCV members would be interested in helping out if we had a recruiting table at this event? There will be a very large amount of foot traffic going by our booth, so we will have a great opportunity to promote the Sons of Confederate Veterans. If you are interested in helping out, please email me at imbel308win@yahoo.com. The SCV has a reciprocity agreement with the NW Civil War Council, that allows us to set up a recruiting table at no charge. 

Thank You,
Erik Ernst Commander

SCV Pacific NW Division

Southern Conservatism by M.E. (Mel) Bradford

This article originally appeared in American Conservatism: An Encyclopedia (ISI Books). It is reprinted by permission of the publisher.

Southern conservatism, as opposed to the generic American variety, is a doctrine rooted in memory, experience, and prescription rather than in goals or abstract principles. It is part of a nonnegotiable Southern identity with what it is prior to what it means. Not the consequence of dialectics or reasoning, it emerges from a historical continuum engendered by a recognizable people who have, over a long period of time, a specific set of experiences. 

Read the full article at The Abbeville Institute website.